2014 May / Hibakusha Stories

Atomic Bomb Survivors To Visit NYC High Schools

6 Videos in HD, in English & Japanese with English Interpretation

May 1, 2014, 9:00am ~ 10:30am

Martin Luther King, Jr. Educational Complex NYC


4 min 29 secs, HD, in English

6 min 17 secs, HD, in Japanese with English Interpretation

6 min 28 secs, HD, in English

13 min 05 secs, HD, in English

20 min 52 secs, HD, in Japanese with English Interpretation

12 min 22 secs, HD, in English & Japanese with English Interpretation

New York, NY – More than 69 years after President Harry S. Truman authorized the use of atomic bombs on the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, stories from survivors resonate with young generations as they learn about the complexities and cataclysms of World War II.

Michio Hakariya was at his house located 3.8 km away from the hypocenter when he experienced the bomb flash and bomb blast. He sought refuge in an air-raid shelter nearby and avoided further exposure to radiation. After the war he taught in high schools for 36 years. Participation in the 2nd Peace Boat Hibakusha Project in fall 2009 was the starting point for him to start telling his story. Mr. Hakariya joined the Nagasaki Foundation for the Promotion of Peace to give his testimony, and he continues to talk about the true nature of nuclear weapons to young people, traveling himself to South East Asia and around the world to do so.

Clifton Truman Daniel is the oldest grandson of 33rd U.S. President Harry S. Truman and the honorary chairman of the Truman Library Institute in Independence, MO. A former journalist and public relations executive, Mr. Daniel is the author of two books on his grandparents, Growing Up With My Grandfather: Memories of Harry S. Truman (Birch Lane Press, 1995) and Dear Harry, Love Bess: Bess Truman’s Letters to Harry Truman, 1919-1943 (Truman State University Press, 2011). He is currently at work on a book on the survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

*** Due to an electrical failure, Ms Reiko Yamada‘s presentation was not recorded. Please watch her presentation at Japan Society in April 29, 2014.

A student in Hiroshima when the atomic bomb was dropped, Reiko Yamada saw a flash in the sky and was thrown to the ground by the force of the blast. Her sister, fortuitously home sick, survived while all of her classmates who were mobilized to work in the city center that day perished. Ms. Yamada vividly remembers and recounts the suffering she observed in her family and neighbors, and now is an outspoken critic of atomic weapons.

Presented By Youth Arts New York, Hibakusha Stories

Videotaped & Edited By East River Films Inc
2014 © East River Films Inc, All Rights Reserved World Wide

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